Putnam/ Dougherty family genealogy

DNA and Ethics

I had my DNA done early, March 2013 with 23andMe. It seams like it was a lot earlier than that. I really liked the information I received and found their website relatively easy to navigate. I made a few connections back then, but no block busting discoveries. One of our main brick walls was with my mothers surname line.  So my sister and I decided to ask our eldest cousin (we only have three and they are all on that line) to do a yDNA test on Family Tree DNA. Just to round things out we also asked our brother to have his yDNA tested. Since we bought and paid for them we were the administrators.
Since then I decided to upload my DNA results to gedmatch.com. Once uploaded I had an unknown cousin contact me that helped solve a brick wall that my sister had been working on for at least 20 years. But it was not the brick wall for my mothers surname.

Now my sister has tested with 23andMe. Recently I talked another cousin into testing after I won a Myheritage DNA kit.
With all these different testing companies I thought it would be a good idea to get all of the test results on gedmatch.com.
When I spoke to my cousin that most recently tested I did speak to him about gedmatch.com. I also sent emails out asking my cousin and my brother for permission to put their results on gedmatch.com. My brother did ask for further information on what this was, and I explained, after that No response.
So there’s a dilemma.
How do I handle this?
What are the ethics about managing others DNA?

 Getting permission is the correct thing to do before uploading someone else’s DNA to a third party site. The problem is not with them it was with how my sister and I approached the DNA Testing. We were so excited about using the DNA results to solve our brick walls and gain further knowledge about our genealogy we did not take the appropriate steps in obtaining a well thought out form of consent from the DNA contributors.  So now I have developed a DNA Consent Form to fill out and have signed by myself/or sister and our relative that we will be the administer for. Hoping this will ease the mind of those we administrate for and ourselves. I have included:

  • Who is paying for the testing. In the past we have paid for all the testing and updating.
  • What type of test they are agreeing to take.
  • That as administrators that we will make all contacts and handle all inquires.
  • That they can elect to have their DNA sample stored or not.
  • That they will have access to their results.
  • That their contact information may not be shared accept for surname.
  • That administrator(s) may upload the results to third party sites for  possible further matching.
  • That the test taker wants/or does not want to be informed about any unexpected results.

Did I miss anything? If presented with a form that includes these items would you sign?

 

 

 

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The Francis Line comes to our family with my maternal grandmother Etta Jane Francis (b. 1889, California) who was one of two daughters of Gilmore C. (b. 1864, California) and Caroline (Batson) (b. 1866, Ohio) Francis. Gilmore’s parents were George Washington Francis (b. 1832, Ohio) and Clementine Shipp (b. 1848, Louisiana). Gilmore had eight brothers and sisters. George Washington Francis was one of 12 children born to William Henry Francis (b. 1798, Virginia) and Susannah Holmes (b.1806, Virginia). William Henry was the eldest of 9 children born to Joseph Francis (b. 1770, Maryland) and Sabitha (Tabitha) Holmes (b. 1775, Virginia). Joseph had an older brother Thomas and their Father was Andrew Francis (b. abt. 1740, Maryland, d. 1804 in Virginia) their mother is unknown at this time. My sister has done all this research on the Francis line. While much is sited in the Francis Family of Fauquier County Virginia ¹ we knew that some of the information was incorrect, therefore Madeleine has done due diligence in verifying the information.

If you click on the names underlined it will take you to a previous post about that person.

In sorting out my files on the Francis line I tried to see if I could place George Washington in a 1860 US Census. We have him in all the other available census plus the California voter registers from 1866 forward. A historical biographical sketch was given in History of the State of California and Biographical Record of the San Joaquin Valley, California ² for George W. Francis.

Also about the same time (1859) he removed to a cattle ranch not far from Visalia, where eventually he gained control of four thousand acres and had large herds of cattle grazing on the plains…….At Visalia in 1860 ³, Mr. Francis married Clementine Shipp, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of George Shipp, one of the earliest settlers of the San Joaquin valley. …….. There is one thing that Mr. Francis takes pride in, and that is that he voted for Abraham Lincoln at Venice, Cal, in 1861.

Well  why is he not in the 1860 census in Tulare County? according to the biographic sketch George W. had previously lived in Mariposa County where he had been Mining .

In 1858,  abandoning mining, he went to the Kings River region and settled in Drums Valley, where he and Andrew Drum engaged in the hog business.

So after some in-depth searches I discovered that Drums Valley (Drumms Valley or Drum Valley) is just west of Badger in northern Tulare County.

Tulare County from Google Earth

So this is the beginning of the Francis family in Tulare county where George lives until his death in 1914. Where is Venice California? I had assumed it was in Los Angeles area (Venice or Venice Beach). After looking into the History of “Venice of America”, I discovered that Venice was originally in the Santa Monica area and the tract of land was sold to Abbott Kinney and his partner Francis Ryan in 1891 where they built a pier. It became Ocean Park in 1895 and when Kinney opened his “Venice of America” park in 1905. So that does not fit the 1861 date for Venice, California. So I looked at the townships in Tulare county for the 1860 US census, no Venice. Then I checked the townships in the 1870 US Census and found the township of Venice. Searching maps of Tulare County I finally found it. Today it would be near Ivanhoe, just East of Ivanhoe are two groups of hills, Venice Hills North and Venice Hills South and Venice Cove (click on image to enlarge).

Mystery solved.

Next Month I will be looking at the first of the two different Hall Family ‘s.



¹Francis Family of Fauquier County Virginia, by Albert O. Felchlia 1992 available at the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah (out of print)

²History of the State of California and Biographical Record of the San Joaquin Valley, California  by Prof. J.M. Guinn, A.M., Chapman Publishing Co. Chicago 1905. Available through the California State Archives, Sacramento, California.

³Clemintine would have been 13 years of age in 1860.

   

The children of Benjamin and Mary Ann (Brown) Fletcher of Cambridge Massachusetts were Mary Ann, Benjamin, William Alfred, and James or Joseph Fletcher. Last week I told you the saga of Benjamin Jr. in trying to determine the reason that Benjamin F. Fletcher, a 70 year old man and his wife Mary Ann would move clear across the country in 1871. (Click on underlined items to view record)

William Alfred Fletcher was born 10 April 1845 in Cambridge Massachusetts.

  • 1850 US Census for Cambridge listed an Alfred Fletcher 5 years old in Benjamin F. Fletcher’s household.
  • 1855 Mass State census list  William A. 12 years old with the Benjamin F. Fletcher family
  • 1860 US Census for Cambridge we find a A.W. Fletcher 18 years of age and a clerk living at home with the family.
  • 1864 William A. Fletcher marries Julia M. Small in Quincy Massachusetts.
  • 1865 Mass State census shows William and Julia living with his parents in Cambridge. William is listed as a clerk.
  • 1865 Cambridge City Directory list William A. Fletcher, baker,  bds at 99 Norfolk (with his parents).
  • 1870 US census finds William and Julia living with his parents in Lexington Massachusetts. William is listed as a farmer. William and Julia have 3 children shown, Marrietta 5, William F. 3, and Freddie B. 7/12.
  • 1880 US census finds William and Julia living within Lexington Massachusetts. William is listed as a R.R. Clerk. They have  4 children in their household. Mary E. 15, William F. 12, Freddie B. 10, and Alice M. 2.
  • 1900 US census finds William A. and Julia still in Lexington. At home with them are William F. 33, Alice M. 23, and Abby L 12. Williams occupation is listed as a Delivery Clerk B & M.
  • 23 April 1906 William A. Fletcher dies at the age of 64 years and 13 days, cause of death Heart disease, occupation is listed as a Delivery Clerk B & M R.R., parents listed as Benjamin F. Fletcher and Mary A. Brown.

James or Joseph Fletcher is born 14 Feb. 1848 in Cambridge. That would have been the same year that Mary Ann and Joseph Putnam’s daughter Mary Ellen Putnam was born.

  • 1850 US census lists James 3 years old.
  • There is no record of a Joseph or James after 1850
  • No death record has been found either.

Benjamin F. Fletcher (carpenter) and Mary A. had 3 grandchildren in Lexington in 1870 and 8 grandchildren in California.  Since Mary Ann and Benjamin’s only have two children living one in Lexington and the other in California. Did they decide that they would move out west to be there for their daughter who had a house full of children, rather then to stay in Cambridge where they had suffered with the loss of two of their children?

Most parents today do not seem to hesitate to move across country to be closer to their grandchildren but  in 1871 that would not have been an easy move. The only convenience was that the United States Transcontinental Railroad was completed May 10th 1869, making travel less arduous. Did William and his family travel west on the railroad to visit while his folks were still alive? Maybe he got a special rate working for the railroad.

That will close the book for now on the Fletchers as I change gears and start on the Francis Family.

 

I’m finally catching up. This is the 6th month and I am on the 6th family line.
The Fletcher line comes on the scene when Mary Ann Fletcher married Joseph Putnam, 28th of May in 1848. Mary Ann

Mary Ann Fletcher

was the eldest child of Benjamin F. Fletcher and Mary Ann Brown of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Benjamin was a carpenter and  while being born in Westford Mass. he lived in Cambridge from at least 1830 up through 1870. Benjamin’s daughter had been living in Clements California since 1859. Benjamin and Mary Ann moved west some time after 1870 and before Mary Ann’s death in 1877.

So my question is why did Benjamin and Mary Ann (Brown) Fletcher move out to California after Benjamin was over 70 years old?

Looking to what was happening with the family in Cambridge Massachusetts may give us the answer. Benjamin and Mary Ann had 4 children. Mary A. was the oldest born in Cambridge 14 Feb. 1830.

Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr. was born in 1833 in Cambridge.

 

  • 1840 US census he would be the 10-15 year old male in his fathers household
  • 1850 US census he is 17 years old working as a clerk and living at home.
  • 1855 Mass state census he is 22 living at home an working as a carpenter. Is father is also listed as a carpenter.
  • 1856 Cambridge City Directory lists Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr  at  99 Norfolk (his parents address)and listed as a carpenter.
  • 1859 Cambridge City Directory list Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr brds (boards) at  99 Norfolk (his parents address)and listed as a carpenter.
  • 1860 not found in the US Census for Cambridge. There is a B.F. Fletcher in Amador County California listed as a Miner from Mass and 27 years of age. Could be him.
  • 1864 Benjamin marries Sarah F. Thurston basically the girl next door. They marry in Cambridge.
  • 1865 Mass State census does not list a Benjamin and Sarah Fletcher. But the 1865 Cambridge City Directory list Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr  h. Norfolk (his parents are at 99 Norfolk in the same directry)and listed as a baker n. Broadway.
  • 22 Nov. 1865 son Charles Fletcher is born in Cambridge.
  • 1866 Cambridge City Directory list Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr b. baker at  83 Norfolk (his parents address is still 99 Norfolk), near Broadway.
  • 1870 US census finds Benjamin Fletcher 34 as a resident at McLean Asylum Somerville Massachusetts.
  • 1870 Cambridge City Directory list Benjamin F. Fletcher Jr (Thurston, Hall and Co,) baker, 46, 48, & 50 Elm, h. 83 Norfolk (his parents address is listed above as 99 Norfolk).
  • 12 June 1872 Benjamin Fletcher dies at the age of 39 years and 5 mos. cause of death Brain disease, occupation is listed as a baker, parents listed as Benjamin F. and Mary Ann.

We can see from the 188o US Census that Benjamin’s Father-inlaw (Daniel H. Thurston) is the Thurston in the Thurston, Hall and Co. Bakery and doing quite well. Benjamin’s wife Sarah is living at home and listed as a widow. She never remarries and is found in the 1890 US census living with a younger sister and her family.

So what happened to Benjamin? What happened to him from 1860 – 1864? Was he in the Civil War? What exactly was a Brain Disease? was it PTSD?

The second and third sons of Benjamin F, and Mary Ann (Brown) Fletcher were William Alfred Fletcher and then James or Joseph Fletcher.

Maybe we can figure this out together. Come on back next week as I continue to discover why a 70+ man from Cambridge Massachusetts would move out to California about 1871.

The Ferguson Line #5

Oops, I’m still behind. May was to have been my maternal Ferguson line. It is halfway thru June and I have done absolutely nothing on the Ferguson binder. I think I am caught up with work and do not have to do anymore traveling, so hopefully I can get back on track.
The Ferguson line first appears when Margaret Helen Ferguson married John Lyle Dougherty (10 Feb. 1868)¹, making her, my great grandmother on my mother’s side.

Margaret Helen Ferguson

Margaret Helen’s father, Joseph, had immigrated from Ireland. Shortly after arriving (1848)² he married Mary Agnes Hall (1849)³ .
Joseph was the son of David Ferguson supposedly a Dublin physician. It has been very frustrating not being able to “jump the pond” when I have so much information on Joseph in this country. At various times prior to the Civil war, Joseph and his wife Mary Agnes had what I presumed were family members living with them who had recently immigrated from Ireland. First Ellen Ferguson (in the 1850 US Census for Forestburg N.Y.) and then a David Ferguson (in the 1855 NY state census for Forestburg N.Y.) Joseph and Mary Agnes also had a son David William who could have been named for the grandfather or the uncle. In that 1855 census the both Joseph and David have been residents of the town for 7 years. They therefore may have come over on the same ship, I have tried looking for a Joseph, traveling with a David and also threw in Ellen. Nothing yet. You would think with the Fergusons being from Ireland instead of Scotland they would be easier to find.

Joseph and Mary Agnes had two daughters and three sons. Margaret Helen, Maryetta, David W., Charles T., and Edwin H.

Maryetta was married  and was a private nurse. I have her married name but have not discovered who her husband was or where she was from 1866- 1900. She then appears in the 1900 US federal census as a widow living with her mother in Manhattan, NY. She apparently had no children and died in 1922 at 69 years of age.

I found where their son David was married in New York to Mary Coleman in 1892, but then I lost track of him.

Joseph’s son, Charles was a mailman in Leavenworth Kansas. He and his wife Rose appear to have had 10 children. Charles died in San Antonio on Christmas day 1934 at 75 years.

Their son Edwin operated a family hotel at the corner of Seventh Avenue and 125th Street in New York City.

The Corner Seventh Ave. & 125 th St NYC
Google Earth

It does not appear to be there anymore. The other two corners have more recent buildings.

My “to do” list includes filling in the gaps for Maryetta and David W. and to continue searching for Joseph’s arrival in America and determining who his parents were. If any Fergusons out there are further along in the quest of locating the parents in Ireland I would love to hear from you. Or even if you are still looking let me know by leaving a comment here. I love hearing from you.

Now on to the Fletcher Family Line.

 


¹Copy of original Marriage certificate.

² Transcript “New York Historic Homes and Family History”, vol. 4 pg.221, Pelletreau, William S. Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Family History of New York. Vol. I-IV. New York, USA: Lewis Publishing, 1907. Ancestry.com

³ 1850 US Federal Census, Forestburgh, Sullivan County, New York, Roll: M432_603; Page: 179B; Image: 366. Ancestry.com

 

Well, here it is the middle of May and I have fallen behind. Each month I am taking one family line and reviewing what information I have, clean up the binder for that line, and determine what research questions I need to pursue. April was to be the month I devoted to my mother’s family line. That’s the Irish Dougherty line. Unfortunately while this is one of my primary lines, I was traveling a great deal of April and did not get anything accomplished.

Through this process of review in March, I was able to piece together information that shed light on the Clough line that had been overlooked previously. My sister and I each work on our family genealogy. She does the paternal lines and I do the maternal lines. We share our research but we had not previously spent much time really checking each other’s findings, but a second pair of eyes and some times a different style of research will see things differently. That was certainly true in that instance.

The 1850 US census is the first to list every member by name in each house on the day of the census. Unfortunately they do not list their relationship, that came in later census. They did generally try to follow some order. The first name in each household would be the “head” of the household , usually followed by the wife, the children, and the servants and/or boarders listed last. In 1850 the number of family members that live in close proximity to each other was a surprise to me but I quickly have learned to look at not only the people listed on the same page as my ancestor, but also the page immediately before and after.  Sometimes when I have had trouble locating a family member I have looked at the entire township. Of course that comes from having started doing family history back in the day when I would order microfilm at the local family history library and deligently look at the entire film, they were not indexed. The discoveries were more sweet and if you stopped when you found what you were looking for you might need to go back to that same film when you moved on to another family member.

Now the 1850 US census for the William Dougherty family in Pennsylvania, Pike county, Lackawaxen township lists: (name, age, male/female, …)

Wm. L. Dougherty, 36, M,

Jane “, 28, F,

John “, 6, M,

Clark “, 4, M,

William “, 2, M,

So who were these people?  This appears pretty straight forward. Father, mother and children. This is on page 46 . Now go back two pages(page 44) and you will find Jane’s father. (name, age, male/female, color, occupation, property value, place of birth.

John Westfall, 55, M, -, farmer, -, N.J.

William “, 31, M, -, farmer, 1500, “.

Soloman “, 28, M,-, farmer, -, Pa

Gabriel “, 22, M,-, student, -, ”

Maria “, 21, F, -, -, “

John “, 17, M, -, farmer, -, ”

Mary B. “, 14, F, -,-,-, ”

Amelia A. “, 24, F, -,-,-, ”

Franklin “, 10/12, M, -,-,-, ”

Joseph Petton, 18, M, -, laborer, -, ”

Hester Allwood, 17, F, -,-,-, N.Y.

Briton Falley, 26, M, -, laborer, -, Ireland

Martin Lawless, 32, M,-, “, -, ”

John Martin, 36,M,-, “, -, ”

Michael Quime, 34, M,-, “, -, ”

Steph Hine, 30, M,-, “, -, ”

James Rock, 20, M,-, “, -, ”

John Calley, 20, M,-, “, -, ”

Michael Lafters, 22, M,-, “, -, ”

John Neal, 23, M,-, “, -, ”

James Conner, 25, M,-, “, -, ”

James Gray, 26, M,-, “, -, ”

(continuing on the next page)

Roger Conner, 24, M,-, laborer, -,Ireland

Edward Bema, 26, M,-, “, -, “

So now it becomes more difficult to asertain how they fit together in this household. We recognize that John’s wife, Jane’s mother is not present, presumed died previous to this census and this was confirmed by later research. William is John’s son and Jane’s brother, as are Soloman, and Gabriel. Now the women are harder to determine if they are daughter’s or daughter-in-laws to John. Maria was a mystery for some time. She is yet to be verified but at this point, I believe, she was a daughter. Then John was a son and Mary B. is only 14 so it was assumed she was a daughter. Now Amelia turns out to be William’s wife and Franklin is William and Amelia’s son. This information was proven by later census. Next are John Petton and Hestor Allwood, one listed as a Laborer but Hestor has no profession so who is she, boarder, servant, relative? Then comes a whole slew of Irish laborer’s. Do they work for John, or merely board there. Hard to tell. Does anyone know? Maybe they are field hands working for John and his boys. Maybe that is how Jane met her Irish husband.

So now it is May and I am supposed to be working on the other Irish line, the Ferguson’s. So lets see if I can get anything accomplished on the Ferguson line this month.

If you need more on the Dougherty line check out earlier posts under Categories at the top right hand side of this post, and scroll down to “Dougherty Ancestors”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a look at this picture and you’ll understand my mother referring to her husbands family as “hillbillies”.

courtesy of Diane Knight

The Clough Family was in California prior to the 1860 United States Census. Thy had migrated to California from upstate New York via Illinois, where many members stayed. But our branch of the tree continued west to Amador, Placer,and Nevada counties in California and later south to Tulare county.

So last time on this blog, I wrote about the  most recent generation of Cloughs that included my Great grandmother Ida May Clough. Her father was Orson Clough. I list 4 siblings for Orson: Benjamin Jr., Lydia, Mary Ann, and another brother.

Benjamin Jr. was born in 1810 in New York, married Lucinda prior to the 1850 US Census. Benjamin and Lucinda had one daughter named for her mother. While in the 1860 US Census Benjamin and Lucinda are found in DuPage, Illinois with two children in their household, they are both listed as 9 years of age. In the 1850 US Census Benjamin and Lucinda (found in Hamburg Erie county New York) only have one child Lucinda E. who is 10 months. About 1856 the entire extended family moved to Illinois.  Also the 1870 US Census shows Lucinda E as the only other Clough in the household with Benjamin (Jr.) and Lucinda. While the age could be incorrectly recorded in the 1860 census, looking at the 1855 NY State census we can find a W. Clough (4 years old) living with B.J. (Sr.)  and L. Clough and listed as gchild. While this does not prove who his parents are we later find William Clough born in 1851 son of Orson and Julia (Marsh) Clough in the 1910 US Census for Tulare county California, living with Ira Blossom (head of household) and his mother Julia(now married to Ira Blossom) where William is listed as stepson to head of household (Ira). Benjamin Jr. died 21 January 1889 in Illinois.

Lydia Clough born 1814 in N.Y. married Joseph McCain. They have two sons Byron born in 1849 in Illinois and Hyrum born in 1856. The year the rest of Lydia’s family moved out to Illinois. Lydia died 31 May 1888.

Next comes Mary Ann Clough born 1816 in New York. This sister to Orson I have not yet proved. Prior to the 1850 US Census only head of household was named and the other members in the house were mere tick marks on a spreadsheet, listed by age groups. So in Benjamin Clough’s household in  the 1820 and 1830 there are appropriate tick marks that could be Mary Ann. Some time prior to 1840 Mary Ann marries Ira Isham and moves to Dane county Wisconsin where she and Ira raise 7 children. Mary Ann is listed in a lineage book as:

…Granddaughter of Ira Isham and Mary Ann Clough, his wife, Gr- granddaughter of Johnson Clough and Lydia Amsdell, his wife, Gr-gr-granddaughter of Abner Amsdell and Susan Sirkin, his wife. Abner Amsdell (1757-1851) enlisted, 1777, under Capt. Daniel Shay, Col. Rufus Putnam. He was at the battle of Bemus Heights. In 1780 he was allowed a pension in Erie county, N. Y., as private, Massachusetts militia. He was born in Deerfield, Mass.: died in Hamburg, N.Y.¹

Mary Ann (Clough) Isham died 1896 in Dane County Wisconsin.

1850 US Census Erie New York

The last sibling for Orson is unknown at this time. In the 1850 US Census for Hamburg in Erie County New York the listing in the Benjamin Clough (Sr.) household shows:

Benjamin (65), Lydia (63), Orson (22), Heritte M. (31), Mariah A. (3), Laura (1), Abner Amsdale (90), and Julia Marsh (18)

While Heritte could be Orson’s wife, I discount that because, while looking at that listing of marriage records that my sister found for Orson and Julia Marsh.

Clough, …….

Henrietta M. and Charles C. Marsh June 27, 1836

……

Mary and Iser Isham Jan. 22, 1836

Orson and Julia Marsh Oct. 29 1851

…..

This is what I think in the 1850 Hamburg census that is Henrietta listed below Orson, his sister not sister in law. Possibly Charles has died, Henrietta has gone home to her parents household and has brought her sister-in law (Julia Marsh) with her to take care of the two young children.

The Mary Clough listed above could be the other sister of Orson who moved to Wisconsin, and who showed her parents as Johnson Clough and Lydia Amsdell. This does not prove her parents but does prove she is a Clough

This opens some doors for further research.What do you think?

My sister is still sorting this Family line out and I have just added to her job. At this point I will close the book on the Clough Family. Next time it will be the daunting Dougherty Line.

Thanks for visiting my blog and I invite you to leave a comment below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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