Putnam/ Dougherty family genealogy

Backup your Genealogy

This past week I took a look at Google Drive. I have been very reluctant to use the “cloud” for my genealogy. I live in an area were internet service can be lost for long periods of time . But my day job has been dealing with clients that have lost their homes this past year in the devastating California wild land fires. It has made me rethink my backup systems for my genealogy. There are lots of different sources out there. I have a Dropbox and ICloud accounts but have not taken the time to utilize either for my genealogy files. I keep seeing all these online webinars for using Google Drive and decided to check it out.

Google Drive is available free to Gmail users. Instead of taking one of those webinar courses I daily get notices for, I decided to google “Google Drive” and found quite a few on YouTube.

I was impressed with:

  • 15GB free storage with each Google account.
  • synchronizing files across multiple devices.
  • manage file sharing
  • document files to .pdfs
  • .pdfs to .doc files
  • Create new documents
  • create new spreadsheets
  • Create slides
  • change text images to text documents.

Using my Google account

  1. I clicked on the “google apps” button in the upper right hand corner.
  2. Clicked on the google drive icon.
  3. From there I followed the steps to create a free google drive account.
  4. Once the account was created, I created a file for genealogy.
  5. On the left hand side is an “Add New”  button. Clicking on this allowed me to import my folder &/or files from the hard drive to Google Drive.
  6. Once uploaded…. Here is what I especially liked. You will notice that the folder has files that are colored. Using the color coding I can quickly find the surnames in my paternal line (blue) or my maternal line (red).

Click on image to enlarge for a clearer image.

  1. To add color to the file image right click on the file icon
  2. Click on change color. You have lots of choices. Click on one.
  3. You have now color coded that file.

You could use a different system  but I want to try this for a while. I now have all my genealogy files available to me on my Ipad, and my smart phone by downloading the Google Drive app.

Now you can work on your files from Google Drive. If you are like me and do not like or are unable to work online you will need to schedule when you will manually update your files on Google Drive.

 

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Who do you think you are? Does this really change after you do a little genealogy research? How about after you get those DNA test results? I thought I knew a lot about who I am. My family was a normal dysfunctional family. We had our rascals and sweethearts. We knew what poverty and wealth looked like. I knew what I did and didn’t want my life to turn into. But who were my people? Maybe that is the question I keep asking and why I still love genealogy. I have learned so much of history and the world. I was not looking for connections to greatness (well maybe at first) and I was not surprised to find just the common folks. But they are still very interesting people that I have discovered. Now I am delving more into the DNA of my family lines and it is interesting and daunting. My motivation was to solve our Brick wall. William L. Dougherty. Click on William’s name to see my earlier blog to learn more about him.

DNA testing
I took my own DNA test back in 2013 with 23 and Me. Gosh was it really 5 years ago. It has not solved my brick wall. I have found lots of connections and we did solve one other brick wall. But not “The One” I was looking for.

So now comes the daunting or maybe tedious work. Finding those collateral descendants who will help us move backward in time.

Who was William L. Dougherty?

Click to enlarge.

The idea is that we need to duplicate our ancestors DNA. The yellow highlighted individual s  the ones that I have. Those with a red dot I am looking for and the orange highlighted ancestor is my target ancestor. The idea is the orange target ancestor gave 50% of their DNA to their children (the next tier to his left) and not the same 50%. Their children gave 25% of the targets DNA to their children (the next tier moving left) and again not the same 25%. The next generation only gets 12.5% of the targets DNA and again not necessarily the same DNA. So my generation only receives about 6.25% of the targets DNA. So ideally if we had 16 descendants tested we may be able to come close to duplicating our targets DNA. That’s a simplified illustration. (Theoretically we could hope to approximate a facsimile of our ancestors DNA but with the endless variables it will be statistically near impossible.)

Start the search

Who is there out there that falls into those boxes?

  • My parent only had two siblings. So my grandparent is as well covered as possible with 5 cousins tested.
  • My grandparent had 6 siblings. 3 died before reaching 10 years of age. Two sisters had children, in this group there are four 1st cousins once removed. I doubt that any here are still alive so I will look for their children &/or grandchildren. The grandchildren will only have 3.125% of targets DNA. Unknown # of 2nd. cousins
  • My great grandparent had 4 brothers. Some time ago I had been contacted by the descendants of one of the brothers. In the mean time we have moved and I lost contact. So I will try to find them again. Of the other three brothers I know of no children. Only one other ever married and I have not as yet found any children for him. That would be a possible 12 3rd cousins.

I will be reaching out to those known to me and see if they have tested or are willing to be tested. So if you are a descendant of William L. Dougherty and you are interested in solving the mystery of who William L. Dougherty was please contact me.

 

 


Mom , Madeleine & I , sometimes Barbara & David too would attend Easter Sunday church at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in Visalia California. Madeleine and I often had matching outfits, hand-me-downs from our uncle’s step daughters.

Easter 1955

Mom might make “Hot Cross Buns”, a nod to her mother and that families British heritage. Grandma Dougherty was not Irish but very British , she had been a great baker more then a cook. Unfortunately I have none of her recipes.
After we got home from church we were then allowed to have our egg hunt. Meanwhile mom would be getting the food together for the family Easter Sunday dinner. Sometimes we would go to Aunt Babe’s.

Barb, Dad Madeleine, Grampy, Ada, David, Mom

She would have a big table set up in the back yard and it would be filled with the traditional fare, ham, potato salads,  fresh peas and carrots. I do not remember it ever raining on Easter back then. Today it is raining and I made the Hot Cross Buns.

 

Hope you are making Easter Memories today.

How do you find the stories about your family?
Sometimes it is a notation in a church record, on the census page, in a newspaper account, a note in a will, or a written history of the town or county they lived in. This week’s prompt is Misfortune. Was it misfortune or just life on the frontier? This week’s story comes from the History of two different communities that were the home for one of my ancestors.

Salem, Massachusetts
The Putnam line has been the famous and the infamous. With the early tales of Salem and Danvers,Massachusetts the Putnam’s of 1690’s have been well documented for their part in the Salem Witch hysteria. In 1695 Ann(e) Putnam wife of Thomas and mother to Ann(e) (one of the accusers) gave birth to Seth who was my 6x great grandfather. In May of 1699 when Seth was only 4 years old his father Thomas died and only 14 days later his mother Ann(e) died. Seth was one of 12 children born to Thomas and Ann(e) (Carr) Putnam. His sister Ann(e) was 20 and brother Thomas was 19 when their parents died. Such a misfortune.

For Seth it must have been difficult growing up never knowing your parents and with the knowledge that your sister and mother played such a major role in the witch hysteria. So who raised Seth? There is a record that notes who the guardians were for the other minor children but not Seth or his younger sister. The probate and guardianship papers on Ancestry for Thomas Putnam are a mess. There are many other Putnam’s intermixed with what is supposedly Thomas’ file. The hand writing to my modern eye is atrocious. So they are no help to me, maybe someone else could sort them out and transcribe them (Madeleine?). When Seth’s sister Ann(e) (who never married) died in 1716 she does mention her brothers by name and Seth is listed in her will.  http://www.writeopinions.com/ann-putnam-jr  “When her parents died in 1699, (Ann) Putnam was left to raise her nine siblings aged 7 months to 16 years.”  When Ann(e) died Seth would have been 21 years old. And probably had been on his own for some time.

Seth Putnam's places of residence.

Click on image to enlarge.

Billerica, Massachusetts.

In 1718 Seth married Ruth Whipple in Salem. Seth is reported in the History of Billerica, Massachusetts, A Genealogical Register to have bought a house-lot and 60 acres in 1719 from Samuel Walker (part of the “Church farm”) in Billerica for £200. His name appears several times in the Billerica town records in 1733.  The  Genealogical Register includes the location of the property and that he had lived there 25 years “and then became a grantee of No. 4” of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the early name for Charlestown, later of New Hampshire.

No. 4 (Charlestown).

From the History of Charlestown, New Hampshire, The Old No. 4 , Seth’s sons Ebenezer and Seth Jr. were at No. 4 in 1746 when Seth Jr. (part of the militia) was the first of the settlers killed by Indians. Another misfortune. In the Evening the women were to go out to milk the cows, Major Josiah Willard and several soldiers accompanied them. As they approached the stables a party of eight Native Americans fired upon them. Seth fell and the Major and the other soldiers returned fire striking two of the raiders who where quickly dragged off by the rest of their party.

The fort at No. 4
CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGE

The remainder of the family including daughter Ruth and sons Thomas and Timothy (my 5x great grandfather) came out to Charlestown about 1750. From the time that the Massachusetts Bay Colony settled No4 until after the Treaty ending the French and Indian War (1754-1763) this outpost was in constant danger. The French and the Native Americans coming down from Canada to raid and fight the settlers and British soldiers, were passing right by this settlement along the Connecticut River. The Fort at No.4 was established about 1745 and Massachusetts provided military protection (by a petition from the citizens to Massachusetts Governor), but life on this frontier was dangerous. Seth’s daughter Ruth married Peter Labaree who was captured by the Indians and managed to escape. Other families had members who were also taken at various times and some were given to the French, who might try to ransom them, or to other Natives Americans who kept them as replacements for their own lost family members. In 1775 a smallpox epidemic swept through the colonies, Seth died that year at age 80, whether or not it was from smallpox I have not been able to determine.

Use History’s of Places.

Title Page History of Charlestown New Hampshire

I really enjoy reading these history’s of the communities were the families lived. It is great that so many of them are now on line. They are not exactly “politically correct” but they do give a look at these early settlements and the families that pioneered them. If you haven’t before or if it’s been awhile, google the town you’re interested in learning more about and see whats out there. You can also use Family Search catalogue file for places and see what they have available.

Excel and Genealogy

Jefferson County Genealogical Society held a workshop this weekend presented by Mary Kircher Roddy   Exel-lence in Genealogy.  I had noticed quite a few webinars lately were being presented on this subject and thought, “I know Excel, maybe this is something I should be looking into.” The class had a wide range of family historians from beginners to professionals along with a wide range of individuals familiar with Excel. Once we were through some of the basics of Excel in the remaining two hours Mary was able to show us lots of ways to use Excel for genealogy.

One of the cleaver things she showed us was how to insert the search results from Ancestry, Family Search and others into our spread sheet. Once we had done that we could sort the information by any of the fields.

So putting this into practice I was interested in finding all the Irish immigrants in Pike County Pennsylvania in the 1850. William L. Dougherty my 2x great grandfather had come from Ireland sometime prior to 1842. Understanding that rarely did an individual come by themselves to some arbitrary location, my sister and I had thought to investigate the others in the area to see if we could discover who William was, exactly when he arrived and perchance what became of him.

click on image to enlarge

So I did a search of Ancestry’s 1850 Census of those born in Ireland living in Pike County, Pennsylvania. This is just a fraction of the individuals that I was able to import to an excel spread sheet. From this I can start researching and making notes on this data sheet about the individuals: when they came, who they came with,  where they came from, and where they where in later census.

The second tip I am putting into practice is the tracking of records. Currently I have a Document Log for each individual.

click on image to enlarge

But if I combine those logs in a Spread sheet by families I might be able to see more patterns or holes.

I like to use colors to designate families. Blue my fathers fathers line and Red my mothers fathers line. It was a system that the original family research binders I bought utilized and I have stayed with it.

 

 

 

 

So now I can use colors to designate other patterns. This may help in finding those family members that went missing. I can already see that I might try looking at Port Jarves for Solomon in 1880.

i’ve used other programs such as Clooz but have spent time typing in data that I never got beyond the imput. What tools are you using to help handle data?

Were the Britsh more likely to leave aWill? 

It seems my British families were into providing Wills. The first Will I discovered on-line was a British Will from 1819 Cheshire England for Robert Heap (4x maternal great grandfather), that I was researching back in 1996. A couple of weeks ago I came across the probate of the Will for Alice Booth (3x maternal great grandmother). So in answer to this weeks prompt from Amy Johnson Crow “Where there is a Will”, I plan on sharing my latest find.

I enjoyed transcribing Alice’s Will. Transcribing gave me an opportunity to really absorb the content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I already knew quite a bit about Alice Booth. She was Alice Robinson born 6 December 1806 and baptized 21 December 1806  in Padiham, Lancashire England to Nancy and Henry Robinson (a Weaver). The granddaughter of Margaret Robinson and an unknown grandfather.

Alice married Joseph Booth a Calico Printer on 10 October 1825 in Padiham. Lancashire, England. In 1827 Alice gave birth to their first child, a son, Henry.  He died the following year, prior to his first birthday. They went on to have 5 more children prior to their leaving England for the United States in Sept of 1842. The manifest for the sailing of the “Garrick” out of Liverpool England shows:

Josh Booth 29, Alice  27, Mary Anne 11, Josh 9, Walter 8, and Nancy 2.

In further searches we find that Serevetus who had been born in 1831 died prior to the 1841 UK census.

In the United States Joseph and Alice had three more children, Issac in 1843 believed to have been born in PA, Alice in 1845 thought to have been born in MA and Sarah in 1846 born in New Jersey. They lived at least 22 years on Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, where Alice died 28 April 1882.

I Alice Booth of the Town of Castleton County of Richmond and State of New York do make publish pronounce and declare this instrument as and forward my last Will and Testament hereby expressly revoking any and all former Wills by me made.

First, I order and direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon after my decease as practicable.

Second I authorize empower and direct that a majority of the Executrixes and Executors of this Will shall whenever they shall deem it  meet for the interest of my estate so to do sell all my property real and personal at public or private sale and good and sufficient deeds and conveyances in the law to execute and deliver to the purchaser or purchasers of such real estate , And until the same is sold I give and devise to my said Executrixes and Executors in trust for the uses and purposes specified in the next clause hereof. Third I order and direct that the rents profits and income of my property until the same shall be applied first to keeping the buildings insured and in repair and paying taxes – and second to paying the interest and principal of the mortgage on my real estate as far as practicable, And if after the payments a fore said there shall be sufficient income therefore their Said Executrixes and Executors shall use the same in the erection of a monument to my deceased son Isaac over his grave not to cost however to exceed the sum of Three Hundred Dollars. And in case there shall not be sufficient income for the payments a fore said and the erection of such monument, then I order and direct that when my real estate shall be sold such monument shall be erected and paid for out of the proceeds of such sale before any distribution of such proceeds shall be made. Fourth The proceeds of the sale of my real and personal property and also all of my property after paying my debts and funeral expenses and erecting such monument. I give devise and bequest in equal shares to my children who shall survive me and to the children of such of my children as have heretofore died – or as may prior to my decease die, the children of deceased children of mine taking the share only which their parent would have taken if living. Lastly I nominate and appoint my daughters Mary Ann Bamber Nancy Gee and Alice Taylor Executrixes and my son Joseph Booth and my son in law James Gee Executors

371

of this my last Will and Testament.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 29th day of January 1880.

Alice Booth (LS.)

The highlighted contents are the facts gleamed from this record. Upon further study more family clues are given in the following probate record.

Satisfactory proof having been made of the due services of the citation heretofore issued in this matter requiring the proper persons to appear on the eleventh day of July 1882 and attend the probate of the last Will and Testament of Alice Booth late of the County of Richmond deceased and Mess De Groot Rawson and Stafford Attorneys for the Executrixes and Executors named in said Will having appeared in support of the proof of the same and John J. Kenney Esq. heretofore appointed special guardian for Isaac Butterworth and George Booth minors two of the heirs  and next of kin of said deceased,……..

So we see that the adult children of Alice are listed as executors of her estate along with her son in-law James Gee who she must have held in high regard. Isaac had died prior to 1880 when Alice wrote the above Will. Could he have died in the American Civil war? He would have been about 18 at the start so there is a very high probability that he was in the Army. That is a research for another time. What about her son Walton/Walter Booth. I have that he did not die until 1893. Why is he left out of the Will? Now Isaac Butterworth would have been Sarah Booth’s son and suggest that Sarah was no longer living in 1882. She is not named as an executor in 1880 so she was either estranged from the family or had died previous to the writing of the Will. George Booth, who was George Booth? Did Isaac leave a son? Joseph jr had a son George but he would have been an adult (22 years old) in 1882. Did Walton/Walter have a son?

Wills and their accompanying documents can contain clues to help solve a mystery or cause more questions to arise. If you have any observations or insights please do not hesitate to make a comment below.

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Langley

 

So this past weeks prompt for Amy Johnson Crows challenge for 52 Ancestors  in 52 weeks was Valentine. I was  not inspired so I am skipping on to next week prompt. We have instead Heirloom. It was a challenge to pick one heirloom that I had not written about previously. There are so many family treasures I enjoy having incorporated into our home. Here is one that holds special interest to me. It’s an item that my third cousin shared with my sister and I. A collection of writings done by my 4x great maternal grandmother, Jane Langley Jones.

I was first made aware of Jane Langley by my grandmother, the great “story” teller, for she told a story about the “Three Langley Beauties”, and Jane was one of the three. So I decided to finally delve into Jane’s writings and make a transcription. In transcribing I have found that I am able to work out almost all the words written. Today was one of those rare snowy Sundays in the Pacific Northwest and a perfect time to get started. The hand writing could be atrocious or maybe it is only due to the fact that I hardly ever get to read something hand written in the 1830’s. There are also many pages that are too faint to read. The collection contains 48 pages.

Jane was born in England about 1814. One of 4 daughters (not three) born to Edward and Mary (Jones) Langley of Coleshill, Warwickshire England. How my cousin Bob A. came by these papers I do not know. What they are, are an assortment of poems, recipes and letters written by Jane. One item has a date of  October 14th 1832 which would have been when Jane was about 18 years of age. The titles on some of her pages include:

To H-

Lemon Wine

Love Forgets

Good Bye

Ginger Wine

God save our Gracious King

My Mother

I give my heart to Thee for Thine

Affection

The Dead Twins

Reminecsence

The Child of Earth

Home

The Exiles Return

JTo the Forget Me Not

The Broken Promise

I can only speculate about the reason for these musings by Jane. Considering her age and the time period I believe she had been introduced to society and was quite the social young woman. The writings paint a picture of a young woman experiencing the drama of young love and the hardships of families.

The poem ” God Save our Gracious King” references King William who came to the throne in 1830 and reigned until his death in 1837.

Click on image to enlarge.

God save our Gracious King

William our Noble King

God Save the King

Send him Victorious

Happy and glorious

Long to Reign over us

God save the King


O Lord our God wise

Scatter his enemies

And make them fall

Confound their Politicts

Frustrate their R….cish tricks

On him our hopes we fix

God save us all


Thy cherish gifts in store

On William Reign to po…

Long may he …..

May he defend our laws

And even give us cause

To sing with heart and voice
God Save the King


Shield him thou good and great

And to our Queen and state

New Blessing  Bring

Great Brittons th… and long

May the expecting thronge

For them re…..d the song

God save the King

I am speculating that Jane wrote this around the time of King William IV’s coronation. History notes that he was much beloved by the people.

Any help on those words I couldn’t workout?

Congratulations mmelo for winning last weeks drawing. Your surprise  gift is going out Monday.

 

 

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