Putnam/ Dougherty family genealogy

Today I want to share with you, the forms I use the most to help me.  You will also find them on the new forms page.

The First one I am providing today is my Mini Group Sheet it is tablet (5.5″x 8.5″) size and I use it as a work sheet. If I am finding lots of families in the records (such as the Parish records in a specific area) with the same last name. I might start keeping track of these families on these sheets. Later I will review this information with other source information(i.e. Census, marriage records, etc.) to develop family relationships.  I like to color code my family group sheets so I have these forms in Blue and Red.  Be sure that you have your printer set on color otherwise its just black and white.. You will find there are two to a page and you can simply cut apart.

Family group sheet mini

The Second form is a Document Log  check sheet. I create a new one for each individual when I first start researching an individual. This is a log of all the records or documents that I have on file for each individual. Each record or document is filed behind or with this log. This will let me know at a glance where the holes in my research are and what areas I need to focus on next. I have also provided blue, red, green and orange logs if you too would like them.

 

There are tricks to remember what the relationship is between two individuals with a common ancestor. If the common ancestor for both individuals a:

  • great grandparent ~then they are 2nd Cousins,
  • 2x great grandparent ~then they are 3rd Cousins,
  • 3x great grandparents~ then they are 4th cousins,
  • 4x ~ 5th cousins, etc.
  • but how about those generations once or twice removed.

That gets a little more difficult. so here is my cheat sheet for you. Click here

If you can print in color I encourage you to do so.

Steps to determine relationship between 2 individuals with a common ancestor.

  1. Find relationship of 1st individual to the common ancestor in the far right hand column above the common ancestor box
  2. Find the relationship of the 2nd individual to the common ancestor in the far right hand column below the  common ancestor box.
  3. Follow the path across and down to where the 1st relationship meets the second relationships row. That intersecting box is the relationship of the two individuals.

Feel free to use any or all of these forms and share. I will be adding others from time to time. If you are following me I will let you know as I add more.

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Some family lines just resonate with me. I identify with them or find something  appealing about one  of the Ancestors in the line. The Langley line begins with my 3x great grandmother Jane Langley, she was referred to by my grandmother as “one of the three Langley  beauties”.  Either Grandma or maybe it was just me had the other two names wrong. I thought the story was:

 Jane, Polly and Sarah were the three Langley beauties, They all married well. Jane came to America, and Sarah went to Cuba.

Jane

Jane Langley

Well for the longest time I could not find Jane. I knew her daughter Ada Jane Jones who was married to Joseph Booth in New York had immigrated to America, but what about her folks? I did later discover that Ada’s parents George and Jane (Langley) Jones did bring their family to the US in 1846 and were in New York in the 1850 US Federal census but then they disappear.

Jane Langley b. 1814 actually had three older sisters,  Myra b. 1799, Elizabeth b. 1801, and Mary b 1804.  No Polly or Sarah. Well maybe Elizabeth was the Polly, but still no Sarah.

Myra

Myra never married and died in Warwick in 1853.

Elizabeth

Could Elizabeth be the Polly in Grandma’s story? Elizabeth married John Plumbridge in 1828.. She and John had nine (9) children in 19 years while living in London. Plumbridge apparently was a prosperous Orange merchant..

  • John L Plumbridge b. 1820 d. 1888 married Charlotte Maria Giles they had (7) children.
  • Sarah Elizabeth b. 1832 d. 1858 never married.
  • Janes Plumbridge b. 1834 d. 1901 married Mary Louisa Horton they had (7) children.
  • Jane Plumbridge b. 1836  d. 1893  never married.
  • Edward Plumbridge b. 1838 d. 1917 married Lousia Maria Pettit they had (7) children.
  • Myra (Mira) Plumbridge b. 1840 d. abt. 1904 married a Congressional Minister James Cullen Hodge they had (3) children.
  • Typhena Plumbridge b. 1841 d. 1914 married John E. Sly and they had (3) children.
  • Isabela Plumbridge b. 1844  d. 1923 never married.

Mary

Instead of Sarah we have Mary who married James Fardon. Mary and James had 5 children. James was a white smith. They appeared to have lived in the Warwick area their entire lives..

  • Edward Langley Fardon b. 1840 d. 1926 married Marry A. Cook they had (9) children.
  • Issac Fardon b. 1841 d. 1846
  • Mary E. Fardon b. 1843 d. 1918 married Edwin Gray they had (4) children.
  • Elizabeth Fardon b. 1844 may have been married twice, two different records of death listed “unsure of place and time”.  She may have spent some time in New Zealand.
  • James Fardon b. 1846 d. 1859

Thomas

The boys in the family starting with Thomas Langley b. 1792  died at age 5 or 6

Edward

Was born about 1795 and seems to have died before reaching maturity.

John

Was born about 1809 and died the following year


High St. Colehill, Warwick, England
from Google Earth

Coleshill, Warwick, England is just east of Birmingham with mostly brick houses on High Street. Since their father  Edward Langley was a bricklayer/mason/builder he probably was kept busy with work in the immediate area.

His father may have been Thomas Langley and his mother may have been Mary Passard.   Edward may have been born in Over Whitacre and baptized there in 1764.

So going on the assumption that Thomas Langley was Edwards father I have been sleuthing around the Over Whitacre in Warwick for the family. Lots of Langleys in the area during this period  I believe that Thomas and Mary had (5) children.

  • Susanna was born about 1762
  • our Edward b. 1764
  • Peggy b. 1770
  • Issac b. 1772
  • Nelly b. 1775

So this is where I will leave this family for now.

 


This month I am looking into the Jones family line on my tree. Common names are very difficult to follow and this one holds true. It is another brick wall.

I had put off working on this line because of the common name “Jones”. Now it seems all I have left (Ha, Ha) are the brick walls.

  • My 2x great grandmother was Ada Jane Jones b. 2 May 1837, original touted as having been born in London. However six months later according to Baptisms in the Parish of St Philip Birmingham, in the county of Warwick she was baptized on 29 November 1837, that is close to Coleshill where her mother’s family (the Langley’s) lived.
    • Jane Langley and George Jones were married by special license on 25 Sept. 1834 in London England
    • Known siblings of Ada Jane Jones include:
      • George M. Jones b. 1838-1840 England
      • Alfred Langley Jones b. 1842 England
      • Walter Jones b. 1844 England
      • Catherine Jones b. 1848 New York
      • Mary Jane Jones b. 1853 New York
    • Ship Franconia to America left from Liverpool England and arrived in New York 22 April 1844 with:
      • George Jones 37
      • Jane          ”    30
      • Ada Jane  ”    7
      • George    ”    4
      • Alfred     ”    2
      • Walter    ”    inft.
    • 1850 US Census New York, New York lists:
      • Geo Jones    45, laborer, Eng
      • Jane       Do.  38, …………., Do.
      • Geo M.   Do.  12, …………., Do.
      • Ada        Do.   13, …………., Do.
      • Cth         Do.     2, …………., N.Y.

When I found this census my first question was “What has happened to Alfred and Walter?” I proceeded to look for them. What I discovered was very limited. The Jones name was too common. I thought Alfred and Walter would set them apart. Lots of Georges around the country but nothing that said this is our George Jones,

  • Ada Jane Jones married Joseph Booth 25 October 1859 in Hudson City, New Jersey. So for the 1860 census she and Joseph Booth show up on their own on Staten Island, New York. Where are the rest of the family members in the 1860″s census?
  • Searched for and did not locate in the 1860 US Census
    • George Jones ≈ 55 years of age
    • Jane Jones  ≈ 46 years of age
    • George M. Jones ≈ 20 years old
    • Alfred Langley Jones = 18 years
    • Walter Jones = 16 years of age
    • Catherine Jones = 12 years of age
  • Searched for and did not locate in New York or New Jersey death record of any of the above.
  • Checked Cemetery where Ada Jane Booth is buried (Fairview Cemetery, Staten Island) for any likely Jones.
  • Searched US Civil War Records for any of the boys. Found a Alfred L. Jones in Louisiana Confederate Army, hum.. doubt that he is ours.
  • I thought well if things did not turn out well for George in the United States maybe he went back to England. I did find a George father and son Alfred in England but not where I would expect them to be. Are they ours?

1870 US Census- Brooklyn
Click on image to enlarge

1900 US Census- Brooklyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1905 NY State Census

google street view
806 Driggs Ave. Brooklyn NY


  • Found a George M. Jones, spouse Matilda, he is a tobacco importer, born in England, living in Brooklyn 1870, 1900 and 1905. He is the right age, for the son, and in 1900 it lists the correct year for coming (1844) to the US. The census shows a daughter Sarah and Maria. Matilda is not in the two later census.

 

Not much to go on there. I continue to look and have submitted what I have to my genealogical society “Common Name Brick Walls”, and will be grateful for all and any ideas.

So that is my Jones Line to date. Interesting fact Jane Langley’s mother was a Jones, a Mary Jones in Warwick England. Have not even begun to look into that.

 

Backup your Genealogy

This past week I took a look at Google Drive. I have been very reluctant to use the “cloud” for my genealogy. I live in an area were internet service can be lost for long periods of time . But my day job has been dealing with clients that have lost their homes this past year in the devastating California wild land fires. It has made me rethink my backup systems for my genealogy. There are lots of different sources out there. I have a Dropbox and ICloud accounts but have not taken the time to utilize either for my genealogy files. I keep seeing all these online webinars for using Google Drive and decided to check it out.

Google Drive is available free to Gmail users. Instead of taking one of those webinar courses I daily get notices for, I decided to google “Google Drive” and found quite a few on YouTube.

I was impressed with:

  • 15GB free storage with each Google account.
  • synchronizing files across multiple devices.
  • manage file sharing
  • document files to .pdfs
  • .pdfs to .doc files
  • Create new documents
  • create new spreadsheets
  • Create slides
  • change text images to text documents.

Using my Google account

  1. I clicked on the “google apps” button in the upper right hand corner.
  2. Clicked on the google drive icon.
  3. From there I followed the steps to create a free google drive account.
  4. Once the account was created, I created a file for genealogy.
  5. On the left hand side is an “Add New”  button. Clicking on this allowed me to import my folder &/or files from the hard drive to Google Drive.
  6. Once uploaded…. Here is what I especially liked. You will notice that the folder has files that are colored. Using the color coding I can quickly find the surnames in my paternal line (blue) or my maternal line (red).

Click on image to enlarge for a clearer image.

  1. To add color to the file image right click on the file icon
  2. Click on change color. You have lots of choices. Click on one.
  3. You have now color coded that file.

You could use a different system  but I want to try this for a while. I now have all my genealogy files available to me on my Ipad, and my smart phone by downloading the Google Drive app.

Now you can work on your files from Google Drive. If you are like me and do not like or are unable to work online you will need to schedule when you will manually update your files on Google Drive.

 

Who do you think you are? Does this really change after you do a little genealogy research? How about after you get those DNA test results? I thought I knew a lot about who I am. My family was a normal dysfunctional family. We had our rascals and sweethearts. We knew what poverty and wealth looked like. I knew what I did and didn’t want my life to turn into. But who were my people? Maybe that is the question I keep asking and why I still love genealogy. I have learned so much of history and the world. I was not looking for connections to greatness (well maybe at first) and I was not surprised to find just the common folks. But they are still very interesting people that I have discovered. Now I am delving more into the DNA of my family lines and it is interesting and daunting. My motivation was to solve our Brick wall. William L. Dougherty. Click on William’s name to see my earlier blog to learn more about him.

DNA testing
I took my own DNA test back in 2013 with 23 and Me. Gosh was it really 5 years ago. It has not solved my brick wall. I have found lots of connections and we did solve one other brick wall. But not “The One” I was looking for.

So now comes the daunting or maybe tedious work. Finding those collateral descendants who will help us move backward in time.

Who was William L. Dougherty?

Click to enlarge.

The idea is that we need to duplicate our ancestors DNA. The yellow highlighted individual s  the ones that I have. Those with a red dot I am looking for and the orange highlighted ancestor is my target ancestor. The idea is the orange target ancestor gave 50% of their DNA to their children (the next tier to his left) and not the same 50%. Their children gave 25% of the targets DNA to their children (the next tier moving left) and again not the same 25%. The next generation only gets 12.5% of the targets DNA and again not necessarily the same DNA. So my generation only receives about 6.25% of the targets DNA. So ideally if we had 16 descendants tested we may be able to come close to duplicating our targets DNA. That’s a simplified illustration. (Theoretically we could hope to approximate a facsimile of our ancestors DNA but with the endless variables it will be statistically near impossible.)

Start the search

Who is there out there that falls into those boxes?

  • My parent only had two siblings. So my grandparent is as well covered as possible with 5 cousins tested.
  • My grandparent had 6 siblings. 3 died before reaching 10 years of age. Two sisters had children, in this group there are four 1st cousins once removed. I doubt that any here are still alive so I will look for their children &/or grandchildren. The grandchildren will only have 3.125% of targets DNA. Unknown # of 2nd. cousins
  • My great grandparent had 4 brothers. Some time ago I had been contacted by the descendants of one of the brothers. In the mean time we have moved and I lost contact. So I will try to find them again. Of the other three brothers I know of no children. Only one other ever married and I have not as yet found any children for him. That would be a possible 12 3rd cousins.

I will be reaching out to those known to me and see if they have tested or are willing to be tested. So if you are a descendant of William L. Dougherty and you are interested in solving the mystery of who William L. Dougherty was please contact me.

 

 


Mom , Madeleine & I , sometimes Barbara & David too would attend Easter Sunday church at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in Visalia California. Madeleine and I often had matching outfits, hand-me-downs from our uncle’s step daughters.

Easter 1955

Mom might make “Hot Cross Buns”, a nod to her mother and that families British heritage. Grandma Dougherty was not Irish but very British , she had been a great baker more then a cook. Unfortunately I have none of her recipes.
After we got home from church we were then allowed to have our egg hunt. Meanwhile mom would be getting the food together for the family Easter Sunday dinner. Sometimes we would go to Aunt Babe’s.

Barb, Dad Madeleine, Grampy, Ada, David, Mom

She would have a big table set up in the back yard and it would be filled with the traditional fare, ham, potato salads,  fresh peas and carrots. I do not remember it ever raining on Easter back then. Today it is raining and I made the Hot Cross Buns.

 

Hope you are making Easter Memories today.

How do you find the stories about your family?
Sometimes it is a notation in a church record, on the census page, in a newspaper account, a note in a will, or a written history of the town or county they lived in. This week’s prompt is Misfortune. Was it misfortune or just life on the frontier? This week’s story comes from the History of two different communities that were the home for one of my ancestors.

Salem, Massachusetts
The Putnam line has been the famous and the infamous. With the early tales of Salem and Danvers,Massachusetts the Putnam’s of 1690’s have been well documented for their part in the Salem Witch hysteria. In 1695 Ann(e) Putnam wife of Thomas and mother to Ann(e) (one of the accusers) gave birth to Seth who was my 6x great grandfather. In May of 1699 when Seth was only 4 years old his father Thomas died and only 14 days later his mother Ann(e) died. Seth was one of 12 children born to Thomas and Ann(e) (Carr) Putnam. His sister Ann(e) was 20 and brother Thomas was 19 when their parents died. Such a misfortune.

For Seth it must have been difficult growing up never knowing your parents and with the knowledge that your sister and mother played such a major role in the witch hysteria. So who raised Seth? There is a record that notes who the guardians were for the other minor children but not Seth or his younger sister. The probate and guardianship papers on Ancestry for Thomas Putnam are a mess. There are many other Putnam’s intermixed with what is supposedly Thomas’ file. The hand writing to my modern eye is atrocious. So they are no help to me, maybe someone else could sort them out and transcribe them (Madeleine?). When Seth’s sister Ann(e) (who never married) died in 1716 she does mention her brothers by name and Seth is listed in her will.  http://www.writeopinions.com/ann-putnam-jr  “When her parents died in 1699, (Ann) Putnam was left to raise her nine siblings aged 7 months to 16 years.”  When Ann(e) died Seth would have been 21 years old. And probably had been on his own for some time.

Seth Putnam's places of residence.

Click on image to enlarge.

Billerica, Massachusetts.

In 1718 Seth married Ruth Whipple in Salem. Seth is reported in the History of Billerica, Massachusetts, A Genealogical Register to have bought a house-lot and 60 acres in 1719 from Samuel Walker (part of the “Church farm”) in Billerica for £200. His name appears several times in the Billerica town records in 1733.  The  Genealogical Register includes the location of the property and that he had lived there 25 years “and then became a grantee of No. 4” of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the early name for Charlestown, later of New Hampshire.

No. 4 (Charlestown).

From the History of Charlestown, New Hampshire, The Old No. 4 , Seth’s sons Ebenezer and Seth Jr. were at No. 4 in 1746 when Seth Jr. (part of the militia) was the first of the settlers killed by Indians. Another misfortune. In the Evening the women were to go out to milk the cows, Major Josiah Willard and several soldiers accompanied them. As they approached the stables a party of eight Native Americans fired upon them. Seth fell and the Major and the other soldiers returned fire striking two of the raiders who where quickly dragged off by the rest of their party.

The fort at No. 4
CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGE

The remainder of the family including daughter Ruth and sons Thomas and Timothy (my 5x great grandfather) came out to Charlestown about 1750. From the time that the Massachusetts Bay Colony settled No4 until after the Treaty ending the French and Indian War (1754-1763) this outpost was in constant danger. The French and the Native Americans coming down from Canada to raid and fight the settlers and British soldiers, were passing right by this settlement along the Connecticut River. The Fort at No.4 was established about 1745 and Massachusetts provided military protection (by a petition from the citizens to Massachusetts Governor), but life on this frontier was dangerous. Seth’s daughter Ruth married Peter Labaree who was captured by the Indians and managed to escape. Other families had members who were also taken at various times and some were given to the French, who might try to ransom them, or to other Natives Americans who kept them as replacements for their own lost family members. In 1775 a smallpox epidemic swept through the colonies, Seth died that year at age 80, whether or not it was from smallpox I have not been able to determine.

Use History’s of Places.

Title Page History of Charlestown New Hampshire

I really enjoy reading these history’s of the communities were the families lived. It is great that so many of them are now on line. They are not exactly “politically correct” but they do give a look at these early settlements and the families that pioneered them. If you haven’t before or if it’s been awhile, google the town you’re interested in learning more about and see whats out there. You can also use Family Search catalogue file for places and see what they have available.

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