Putnam/ Dougherty family genealogy

Were the Britsh more likely to leave aWill? 

It seems my British families were into providing Wills. The first Will I discovered on-line was a British Will from 1819 Cheshire England for Robert Heap (4x maternal great grandfather), that I was researching back in 1996. A couple of weeks ago I came across the probate of the Will for Alice Booth (3x maternal great grandmother). So in answer to this weeks prompt from Amy Johnson Crow “Where there is a Will”, I plan on sharing my latest find.

I enjoyed transcribing Alice’s Will. Transcribing gave me an opportunity to really absorb the content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I already knew quite a bit about Alice Booth. She was Alice Robinson born 6 December 1806 and baptized 21 December 1806  in Padiham, Lancashire England to Nancy and Henry Robinson (a Weaver). The granddaughter of Margaret Robinson and an unknown grandfather.

Alice married Joseph Booth a Calico Printer on 10 October 1825 in Padiham. Lancashire, England. In 1827 Alice gave birth to their first child, a son, Henry.  He died the following year, prior to his first birthday. They went on to have 5 more children prior to their leaving England for the United States in Sept of 1842. The manifest for the sailing of the “Garrick” out of Liverpool England shows:

Josh Booth 29, Alice  27, Mary Anne 11, Josh 9, Walter 8, and Nancy 2.

In further searches we find that Serevetus who had been born in 1831 died prior to the 1841 UK census.

In the United States Joseph and Alice had three more children, Issac in 1843 believed to have been born in PA, Alice in 1845 thought to have been born in MA and Sarah in 1846 born in New Jersey. They lived at least 22 years on Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, where Alice died 28 April 1882.

I Alice Booth of the Town of Castleton County of Richmond and State of New York do make publish pronounce and declare this instrument as and forward my last Will and Testament hereby expressly revoking any and all former Wills by me made.

First, I order and direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon after my decease as practicable.

Second I authorize empower and direct that a majority of the Executrixes and Executors of this Will shall whenever they shall deem it  meet for the interest of my estate so to do sell all my property real and personal at public or private sale and good and sufficient deeds and conveyances in the law to execute and deliver to the purchaser or purchasers of such real estate , And until the same is sold I give and devise to my said Executrixes and Executors in trust for the uses and purposes specified in the next clause hereof. Third I order and direct that the rents profits and income of my property until the same shall be applied first to keeping the buildings insured and in repair and paying taxes – and second to paying the interest and principal of the mortgage on my real estate as far as practicable, And if after the payments a fore said there shall be sufficient income therefore their Said Executrixes and Executors shall use the same in the erection of a monument to my deceased son Isaac over his grave not to cost however to exceed the sum of Three Hundred Dollars. And in case there shall not be sufficient income for the payments a fore said and the erection of such monument, then I order and direct that when my real estate shall be sold such monument shall be erected and paid for out of the proceeds of such sale before any distribution of such proceeds shall be made. Fourth The proceeds of the sale of my real and personal property and also all of my property after paying my debts and funeral expenses and erecting such monument. I give devise and bequest in equal shares to my children who shall survive me and to the children of such of my children as have heretofore died – or as may prior to my decease die, the children of deceased children of mine taking the share only which their parent would have taken if living. Lastly I nominate and appoint my daughters Mary Ann Bamber Nancy Gee and Alice Taylor Executrixes and my son Joseph Booth and my son in law James Gee Executors

371

of this my last Will and Testament.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 29th day of January 1880.

Alice Booth (LS.)

The highlighted contents are the facts gleamed from this record. Upon further study more family clues are given in the following probate record.

Satisfactory proof having been made of the due services of the citation heretofore issued in this matter requiring the proper persons to appear on the eleventh day of July 1882 and attend the probate of the last Will and Testament of Alice Booth late of the County of Richmond deceased and Mess De Groot Rawson and Stafford Attorneys for the Executrixes and Executors named in said Will having appeared in support of the proof of the same and John J. Kenney Esq. heretofore appointed special guardian for Isaac Butterworth and George Booth minors two of the heirs  and next of kin of said deceased,……..

So we see that the adult children of Alice are listed as executors of her estate along with her son in-law James Gee who she must have held in high regard. Isaac had died prior to 1880 when Alice wrote the above Will. Could he have died in the American Civil war? He would have been about 18 at the start so there is a very high probability that he was in the Army. That is a research for another time. What about her son Walton/Walter Booth. I have that he did not die until 1893. Why is he left out of the Will? Now Isaac Butterworth would have been Sarah Booth’s son and suggest that Sarah was no longer living in 1882. She is not named as an executor in 1880 so she was either estranged from the family or had died previous to the writing of the Will. George Booth, who was George Booth? Did Isaac leave a son? Joseph jr had a son George but he would have been an adult (22 years old) in 1882. Did Walton/Walter have a son?

Wills and their accompanying documents can contain clues to help solve a mystery or cause more questions to arise. If you have any observations or insights please do not hesitate to make a comment below.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jane Langley

 

So this past weeks prompt for Amy Johnson Crows challenge for 52 Ancestors  in 52 weeks was Valentine. I was  not inspired so I am skipping on to next week prompt. We have instead Heirloom. It was a challenge to pick one heirloom that I had not written about previously. There are so many family treasures I enjoy having incorporated into our home. Here is one that holds special interest to me. It’s an item that my third cousin shared with my sister and I. A collection of writings done by my 4x great maternal grandmother, Jane Langley Jones.

I was first made aware of Jane Langley by my grandmother, the great “story” teller, for she told a story about the “Three Langley Beauties”, and Jane was one of the three. So I decided to finally delve into Jane’s writings and make a transcription. In transcribing I have found that I am able to work out almost all the words written. Today was one of those rare snowy Sundays in the Pacific Northwest and a perfect time to get started. The hand writing could be atrocious or maybe it is only due to the fact that I hardly ever get to read something hand written in the 1830’s. There are also many pages that are too faint to read. The collection contains 48 pages.

Jane was born in England about 1814. One of 4 daughters (not three) born to Edward and Mary (Jones) Langley of Coleshill, Warwickshire England. How my cousin Bob A. came by these papers I do not know. What they are, are an assortment of poems, recipes and letters written by Jane. One item has a date of  October 14th 1832 which would have been when Jane was about 18 years of age. The titles on some of her pages include:

To H-

Lemon Wine

Love Forgets

Good Bye

Ginger Wine

God save our Gracious King

My Mother

I give my heart to Thee for Thine

Affection

The Dead Twins

Reminecsence

The Child of Earth

Home

The Exiles Return

JTo the Forget Me Not

The Broken Promise

I can only speculate about the reason for these musings by Jane. Considering her age and the time period I believe she had been introduced to society and was quite the social young woman. The writings paint a picture of a young woman experiencing the drama of young love and the hardships of families.

The poem ” God Save our Gracious King” references King William who came to the throne in 1830 and reigned until his death in 1837.

Click on image to enlarge.

God save our Gracious King

William our Noble King

God Save the King

Send him Victorious

Happy and glorious

Long to Reign over us

God save the King


O Lord our God wise

Scatter his enemies

And make them fall

Confound their Politicts

Frustrate their R….cish tricks

On him our hopes we fix

God save us all


Thy cherish gifts in store

On William Reign to po…

Long may he …..

May he defend our laws

And even give us cause

To sing with heart and voice
God Save the King


Shield him thou good and great

And to our Queen and state

New Blessing  Bring

Great Brittons th… and long

May the expecting thronge

For them re…..d the song

God save the King

I am speculating that Jane wrote this around the time of King William IV’s coronation. History notes that he was much beloved by the people.

Any help on those words I couldn’t workout?

Congratulations mmelo for winning last weeks drawing. Your surprise  gift is going out Monday.

 

 

Was Nimrod Holmes a nimrod?

This week #52 Ancestors prompted us with “favorite name”. This past week I was working on the Holmes line. That’s part of my paternal line and as you may already know if you have been following my blog that is the side that truly had very colorful people. While I love the colorful it may be where some of those questionable genes came from. This name I found while working on the Holmes line plays right into that.
Nimrod Holmes was born to Peter Holmes and Elizabeth Redman 08 March 1819 (wow almost 200 years ago) in Ohio. Probably Muskingum county. Nimrod was my 3x great grandmother’s (Susannah Holmes Francis) brother. Yes I do collateral relatives because I learned that when I’m “killing off” the relatives it may help establish further proof on the family line.

I came across the name and was commenting to my husband about the unusual name of Nimrod, and being the wordsmith that he is, he told me about the name. He said we use, “don’t be such a nimrod”, but it also means skilled hunter. Okay and how do you know all this I asked,  he shrugged his shoulders and turned to “google” to verify. And they did.

nim·rod

[ˈnimräd]

NOUN

nimrods (plural noun)
  1. literary
    a skillful hunter.
  2. N. AMER.
    informal
    an inept person.

On further investigation we learned Nimrod was in the Bible. I did not remember that. The online Webster dictionary defines

Nimrod: a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar;

My conclusion is that Peter and Elizabeth were using the bible as the source for baby names. Now that we know where the name comes from the question begs to be asked was Nimrod Holmes a nimrod?

1810 US Federal Census Fauquier Co., VA (Click on image to enlarge)

 

Born in Ohio after Peter and Elizabeth Holmes had moved out from Fauquier county Virginia some time after their son Joseph had been born in 1813. One of 13 children, Nimrod is somewhere in the middle. I have not yet established all birthdays or the birth order of the children. There is a 6 year gap between Joseph and Nimrod. Part of that could be accounted for while Peter was involved in the 1812 War.

 

 

1840 US Census Hopewell, Muskingum, Ohio

Nimrod first appears in the 1840 US census in Hopewell Muskingum county Ohio after his marriage that same year to Frances Ann Mauk  on 19 May in Muskingum County.

Through the US census we find Frances and Nimrod having 6 children, George W. born 1841, William H. born 1843, Melissa born about 1851,  Nimrod P. born about 1856, Fenrick born about 1857 and Martha born about 1863. Now I am thinking that Nimrod P. and Fenrick may be the same person. Fenrick  Nimrod is named as one of his children in Nimrod’s last will and testament found on Ancestry.com. But there is no Nimrod P. listed. And I do not see them in the same census together.

Nimrod was no slouch. In his will he leaves quite a bit of property to his wife Frances and the various children and one grand child.

1st. I give and devise to my beloved wife Frances Holmes in lieu of her dower the farm on which we now reside situated in Washington Township, Union Co., O. containing about 60 acres…………. Also my farm containing 160 acres situated in Washington County Kansas on which Fenrick N. Ho(l)mes now resides…… Also all of my real estate in Hilliard, Franklin County, Ohio. At the death of my said wife the real estate afore said I give and devise as follows.

2. I give and devise to my son William H. Holmes eighty acres on the east side of the said farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Washington Co, Kansas

3. I give and devise to my son Fenwick N. Holmes eighty acres on the west side of said farm in Washington Co. Kansas.

4. I give and devise to my daughters Melissa Leion and Martha Romack the said farm on which I now live in Washington Township Union Co, O, to be divided equally by running a line East and West. I desire that daughter Melissa Lion shall have the South half of said farm and my daughter Martha Romack shall have the North half during their natural lives, and at their death to go to their legal heirs.

5. I give and devise to my grandson W.H. Holmes one lot of land situated in the City of Columbus

6. I give and bequeath to Mary Super the west lot of my three town lots in Hilliard Station.

7. I desire that a monument costing four hundred dollars be erected at the graves of myself and wife the expense of which shall be borne by my four legal heirs equally, before they get possession of the land here by devised.

I desire that no appraisement and no sale of my personal property be made. ………………………….

So the answer is that Nimrod S. Holmes was no nimrod. I still have a few genealogical questions on Nimrods family to sort out but I just love reading these old wills. And now we all are asking “who is Mary Super?”

Leave a comment below prior to February 14 2018 and you will be entered in a drawing for a Surprise Gift.

 

 

 

 

 

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Easy Rice Pudding~

Mom’s Recipe
What do you do with leftover white rice besides eat with milk and sugar the next morning for breakfast? My mom would make Rice Pudding which I just loved. This is a great recipe and one that I use often. So when I saw this weeks prompt “invite to dinner” I decided if company were coming for dinner I would make mom’s Rice Pudding.

Here’s the recipe I had mom write out for me about 50 years ago.    

Ingredients:

1 cup cooked rice

1 cup of sugar

3 eggs

3 cups of milk

1 tsp. vanilla

dash of salt

I use whatever rice is left over sometimes it’s as little as 3/4 of a cup or even up to three cups .

I always use mom’s soufflé dish for this recipe. It is just the right size.

If you cook the rice first be sure to let it cool before adding the other  ingredients. I mix everything right in the dish I use to bake the pudding.

Mix the sugar with the rice.

Pour in the milk. Beat the eggs well, then add, stirring til the rice is well distributed and not clumpy. Add the vanilla and salt. Stir well.

I like to grate fresh nutmeg on top.

 

Place the dish in a hot oven in a water bath

 

 

 

 

 

  

Bake at 350 degrees until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Approximately 1 1/2 hours.

Allow to cool before serving. Fixing “Rice Pudding” always brings back memories of mom.  I hope you try this recipe and let me know what you thought.

Last weeks giveaway goes to Pat McAlexander. Congratulation and thanks for making a connection.

 

  • #52Ancestors challenges us with the word “longevity”.  As we move backwards in time the average life expectancy diminishes. Most of my ancestors fell into the average. There were a few exceptions to this but nothing like my husbands Aunt Clara. She died 14 days short of her 105th Birthday in 2010.

Another type of longevity is length of marriage. How many marriages in your family have celebrated 50 or even 75 years? The longevity of marriage has also changed through the decades but instead of getting longer because people live longer, the tendency has shortened due to divorce and/or couples living together without marriage. Last year my in-laws celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary and they are still going strong, and my husband and I have just celebrated 52 years.

Genealogy not only looks at history but also sociology. The social standards have certainly changed  since my 2x great grand parents celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary 2 September 1910 in California, and went on to reach the 54 year mark. Your life expectancy was 42 years in 1860.  So being able to celebrate 50 years marriage on the average would have been difficult to achieve. Where today’s average life expectancy is 78 years, making it a little more common to make that milestone if you can stay married.

Francis 50th Wedding Anniversary Cup
photo by mmelo

George Washington Francis and Clementine Shipp married back in 1860 in California. George had come west in a covered Wagon and lived briefly in Eldorado California before moving down to the Visalia area. Clementine’s family had moved west from Louisiana and in 1852 they lived in the Los Angeles area before settling in the area east of Visalia. In 1860 Clementine was only about 13 years old and George was 28 years old. Today that would raise a lot of eyebrows. Then having their son William only 7 months later would  have also raised a few eyebrows. The average age for women to marry increased from the age of 20 in the 1800 to 22.5 in the 1900 and today is about 25. So Clementine’s age was very young even back then. The crossover of the average woman having her child before the average woman’s first marriage,  occured in the 1970’s. My conclusion is that early births in the first year of marriage had been steadly increasing and once women got the vote and worked outside the home they were putting off  marriage until the last possible moment and today more children are participating in the wedding ceremony of their parents.

Soon after Clementine and George were married the American Civil war erupted. What was it like for the Shipp’s and the Francis’s. I’m sure it sparked some debates in their household. Ohio was a free state and Louisiana was a slave state. Looking back though Clementine’s family history we can find that the Shipp’s were once slave owners. Since California had many pioneering families from both northern and southern states it is not surprising to know that there were those on both sides of the issues. George may have felt strongly about the war for he lost his brother, Andrew Francis, in 1862 at Stoney Point, Tennessee fighting for the union.

Tulare County Land Map

When Clementine and George married it was very much the wild west. Tulare county had lots of Indians and vaquero’s. George was a cattleman and Clementine kept house and raised a herd of children. They owned a 1/2 section of land east of Ivanhoe (north of the town of Visalia).

In 1863 construction on the Transcontinental railway was started. By the time it was completed George and Clementine had 4 children with the fifth on the way. Travel had certainly changed during their life time, going from traveling across country taking several months, to the completion of the Railroad across this nation, to the Model T Ford being manufactured and cars competing with the horse in our mode of daily transportation, and the Wright Brothers  taking flight at Kitty Hawk. They experienced the assassination of two presidents, Lincoln and McKinley. And read about the sinking of the Titanic. The were able to welcome in the 2oth century. They spent their entire married life living near Visalia California. They raised nine children and 4 of them died before they did.

After helping to develop the west, women were finally allowed to vote in California in 1911. The telephone was only used for local calls, it wasn’t until 1915 that you could phone across the country, but the telegraph had connected the east coast to the west since 1861. I certainly hope that Clementine exercised her vote a few dozen times before her death in 1928, 14 years after George had died in 1914.

Leave a comment before my next posting (Jan. 30th) and I will enter your name in a drawing for a special package of family note cards.

 

This weeks challenge is to write about my favorite photo. With my passion of genealogy also comes a love of all these old family photos. Instead of trying to choose one, I think I’ll show you a few that have changed how I view those in the photos from how I knew them.
It is great to be able to put a face and context to our family who we did not know in the prime of their lives.

Well that’s a real disappointment. The first photo I was going to go with I can not find. The photo is  of my maternal grandfather when he was at Cornell and when I look at it I see a different young man from the person I only knew as an elderly and stern man. Another one from that same time period is this one of my grandparents on the day they were married. It is not a formal photo and they truly look very happy and carefree. Nothing like the buttoned-up formal couple they were in latter life.

This next photo is of my paternal grandparents who were quite different from my other grandparents. Here they look to be teenagers, that would make it taken about 1900. Since grandpa Ike died when I was just 2 years old I have no memory of him but my grandma (Gay) lived to be 93 I felt I really knew her. She was a little rough around the edges but had a huge heart. This was said to have been taken on the Elliott ranch, where her parents worked, near Visalia in California and it looks like their home was also a little rough. They were most likely pretty poor. Ike is wearing both suspenders and a belt. Her hair is quite something.

 

This next one is my mothers brother, Walt, who as a kid appears to be a”class clown”.  I think he is about 10 years old here. He was a thespian and a swordsman in college and later in life was a drum major for his local Shriners unit. The man I knew was mechanically inventive and a hard worker.

 

And now  this is one of my father and his sister (Eunice). It was taken in 1926. This is his first car. I do not know why his sister has a bouquet but I am assuming it was a special occasion. But why are they so serious? My aunt was always one with a ready smile and always so stylish. She was very particular about her clothes. She did not have a lot of clothes but she always handled them with great care and put them away wrapped with tissue paper. Now my dad worked road construction jobs when I was growing up. He drove a grader and came home filthy dirt. He would always clean up before dinner but I did not consider him “dapper”,  but many of his pictures from his younger days show him fairly well dressed, and that car was a “Star” (brand name) and looks quite sporty.

 

It’s a new year and a fresh start.

Each year I renew a challenge to myself to continue with documenting the families that makeup who I am. Once again Amy Johnson Crow has thrown out the gauntlet and challenges us to develop the habit of writing/recording our family history discoveries and sharing them as 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. I hope you will enjoy these blogs on another 52 Ancestors.


The Holmes line starts in our family when William Henry Francis married Susannah Holmes 20 July 1826 in Zanesville, Ohio. William Henry Francis is my 3x great grandfather on my paternal side. Susannah Homes is the 2nd child of 14 children born to Peter and Elizabeth (Redman) Holmes 22 November 1806. Now Peter was the son of George and Anne (Hill) Holmes of Fauquier County Virginia. His sister was Sabitha (or Tabitha) who had married Joseph Francis in 1797, and their son William Henry was born in 1798, thus making William and Susannah first cousins and Sabitha is not only Susannah’s aunt she is her mother-in law.

Marriage to a first cousin may seem strange to some of us here in the United States but it is actually not unusual in many other countries. Here in the United States only 19 states actually have restrictions against first cousins marriage, and only 5 have it as a criminal offense. First cousin couples risk for birth defects are around 6% where non-related couples risk of birth defects stand about 3% as reported in the Independent. First cousin marriages are more common in the Middle East and it may be approximatly 10% of marriages worldwide are between first cousins.

So as we do our genealogy we should feel no need to raise an eyebrow over cousins marrying,  after all it may be better for some to marry the cousin they know than a stranger. 

Susannah Holmes was born in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. Francis and Holmes appear both in Fauquier  County Virginia and Muskingum County Ohio. The two families are intertwined for generations in both Virginia and Ohio. So maybe it is not surprising that William Francis and Susannah Holmes are married in 1826 after both families had moved west to Zanesville, in Muskingum County Ohio. I want to explore this further, although they are not direct ancestors I have already noted several siblings that marry either another Holmes or a Francis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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